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CRIMEAN WAR

In June 1853 the 28th Regiment went to Leeds. One and a half companies were at Scarborough, four at Hull, three at Bradford, half a company at Barnsley, one company with the head-quarters and recruits at Leeds.

12th February 1854 the Regiment was put on alert for war. On the 14th the detachments were ordered to Preston and preparations made for embarkation to Turkey.

On the 22nd the 28th proceeded by train for Liverpool. The war was enthusiastically supported by the British people and crowds lined the route to cheer the men to war. At Liverpool the crowds were so dense that it was difficult for the men to march along the streets. The Mayor, Aldermen and chief officers of Liverpool gathered to welcome the Regiment.

The Regiment embarked on the 'Niagara' that afternoon and on the 23rd the ship sailed for Malta.

The Officers of the 28th Foot:

Lieut-Colonel Frank Adams
Major R. J. Baumgartner
Major R. H. Lindsell
Captain M. Andrews
 Captain P. A. Butler
Captain Huey
Captain W. Roberts
Captain H. F. Wakefield
Captain J. G. R. Aplin
Captain T. Maunsell
Captain H. R. Godley
Lieutenant J. D. Malcolm
Lieutenant C. H. H. Orlebar
Lieutenant Biddle
Lieutenant J. Ramadge
Lieutenant J. Gandy
Lieutenant S. L. A. B. Messiter
Lieutenant W.G. Shute
Lieutenant T. L. Bell
Lieutenant S. Hackett (Adjutant)
Ensign T. L. Bell
Ensign J. Williams
Ensign Worthington
Ensign T. S. Kirkpatrick
Ensign H. F. Morgan
Ensign G. Halford
Ensign E. S. Waldy
Paymaster T. Benson
Surgeon W. H. Young
Assistant-Surgeon W. H Brice
Assistant-Surgeon C. G. Irwin
Quartermaster J. Spence


The 28th arrived at Malta on the 3rd March and moved into Verdala Barracks. 7th April they boarded the ships HMS Vesuvius and HMS Cyclops for Turkey. By the 16th they had landed at Gallipoli, marching to the village of Chiflick. A month later they moved to Boulahar to help the French dig earthworks. The 28th boarded the 'Simoom' on the 22nd June and landed at Varna on the 29th. They moved into camp near Lake Devnah. They were part of the 3rd Division, commanded by Lieutenant-General Sir Richard England, K.C.B. This consisted of the 4th, 28th, 38th, 44th and 50th Regiments.

In the summer heat sickness and disease was prevalent. Cholera broke out, in one month 33 men were lost and Captain Huey, Lieutenants Ramadge and Gandy, and Surgeon Young were invalided back to England.

Boarding the Cyclops again the 28th now had 26 officers, 37 Sergeants and 720 men. The huge Allied fleet anchored off Odessa for 2 days before heading for Sebastopol.  14th September the 28th landed in the Crimea. Without tents the Regiment settled down in heavy rain for the night. The tents did not arrive for 2 days.

On the 19th the Army began advancing towards the Russian positions. The next day the Battle of the Alma resulted in an Allied victory, sweeping the Russians from the hights of the Alma.  After the battle the 28th assisted in burying the dead and collecting the wounded.

On the 26th September the 28th were a mile from Balaclava. 30 men were taken from each Regiment to provide a garrison for the town. Then the Army moved towards Sebastopol. On the 1st October, the 28th were stationed on the extreme left of the British lines.

17th October, the Allied bombardment of Sebastopol began. The 28th began trench duties, 24 hour duties. Between the 17th and 20th the Regiment lost 1 Colour-Sergeant and 5 men killed in the trenches.


  A private of the 28th Foot, Crimea. 1855.

5th November the Russians had moved to the Inkermann Heights. 60,000 Russian troops attacked the 8,000 strong British force. The 28th had only 100 men available, the rest being in the trenches. But by the afternoon the Russians were retreating, leaving 15,000 dead and wounded. The 28th were ordered to move to the Heights and build defensive works.

Life in the camp was harsh. The men had only tents, were living on salt provisions and biscuit and the men had no winter clothing.

Lieutenants Bell and Halford, and Quartermaster Spence died, and Paymaster Benson was invalided home. To the 30th of November the 28th had lost 2 sergeants and 17 men to disease.  Another 72 were sick in Scutari. In December another 20 men died and 73 sent to Scutari. The weather worsened and in January 55 men died in camp, 1 was killed in the trenches, and 44 more died in Scutari.

A draft of men arrived from Malta. The new Officers were Lieutenants Brodigan, Ingham, Magennis and Steward. In February 37 men died in camp. Another 41 died at Scutari. In March another 31 died in camp, 18 at Scutari and 28 more were sent to Scutari. Finally good provisions were reaching the Army.

Lieutenants Kirkpatrick and Denny were invalided home.

In April 1 man was killed in the trenches, 10 died of disease in camp, 4 died at Scutari and another 30 were sent to the hospital there. The camp was greatly improved and in May 1 man died of disease in camp, 2 died at Scutari and 14 were sent to the hospital.

5th June an assault was made on the Russian rifle-pits, which were taken and held. On the 7th an attack was made on the Quarries, which were also taken.

17th June the new Enfield Rifle was issued to the 28th Foot. Early next morning the 3rd Division moved into position to attack the Redan. The attack did not succeed and the men were caught in the Cemeteries, surrounded by Russian guns. The 28th entered the Cemetery about 3.30am and held on to midnight, when they were withdrawn.

9 men had been killed, 7 died of their wounds later. 5 Officers and 49 men were wounded, 3 were taken prisoner.

The wounded Officers were Captains Aplin, Godley and Malcolm, Lieutenants Brodigan and Leonard.

In June 25 men were sent sick to Scutari, 11 died in camp, and Lieutenant H. F. Morgan was badly wounded in the trenches.

18th September the French took the Malakoff. The British attacked the Great Redan. That night the Russians began burning their ships in the harbour and abandoning Sebastopol. After nearly 11 months of siege the town fell. By November wooden huts had arrived from England and good roads were built in the camp. Good winter clothing was issued.

31st March Peace was declared. 24th May the 28th embarked on the 'Adelaide' and landed in Malta on the 1st June.

French Awards to the 28th:

Colonel Frank Adams, C.B. - French Legion of Honour
Lieut-Colonel P. A. Butler - Chevalier of the Legion of Honour
Major J. G. R. Aplin - Chevalier of the Legion of Honour
Major William Roberts - Chevalier of the Legion of Honour
Captain C. H. H. Orlebar - Chevalier of the Legion of Honour
Private Charles Smith - Cross of the Legion of Honour, 5th Class.
Sergeant William Cook - French military medal
Sergeant George Demery - French military medal
Private John Blake - French military medal
Private James Carson - French military medal
Private Michael Connell - French military medal
Private William Dunn - French military medal
Private John Tobin - French military medal

In May 1855 a parade and ceremony was held in London, Queen Victoria presented the Crimean medal to selected men from many Regiments. The men of the 28th who received their medals from the Queen were:

Major R. H. Lindsell
Major H. F. Wakefield
Captain O. R. H. Orlebar
Private William Carey
Private John Edwards
Private Patrick Fitzgerald
Private William Wild

18th August 1857 Sir John Pennefather presented the 'Sardinian Medal' to

Colonel Frank Adams, C.B.
Major T. Maunsell
Captain S.L.A.B. Messiter
No. 3361 Cpl. John McLaughlin
No. 2958 Pte. William Gleeson.

In 'the Back Badge' (Gloster Regt. 1928) is the following note:
"Crimean Medal to Private J. Tinson: Tinson's medal is not an authorised war medal and therefore could not have been worn in uniform, it is stated to have been "Presented to wounded, 20th September 1855."

The closest that I can find in the casualty roll is Pte J. Timpson, wounded 18/21 Oct. 1854.


GRAVES IN THE CRIMEA

At Scutari :

"SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF LIEUT. J. HOLFORD. H.M. 28th REGIMENT. DIED 29th NOVEMBER 1854. ERECTED BY A FRIEND."

Third Division Graves:

"SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF Mrs BRETT WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE ON THE 7th OF JUNE 1855 AGED 26 YRS. THIS STONE WAS ERECTED BY THOMAS BRETT 28th REG.

"SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF Dr. Stephen O'Brien. Pts John Dean. James Wibber. who died of their wounds received on the 18th June 1855. This stone is erected as a token of respect by No.1 Coy 28th Regt."

"SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF THE GRENADIERS OF THE 28th REGT. WHO DIED DURING THE CAMPAIGN ON THE CRIMEA."

"IN MEMORY OF Qr Mr SAML. SPENCE. 28th REGT. DIED 7 NOV. 1854."


Memorial at Haida Pacha, Turkey
"To the memory of Lieut. Montagu Wigley Bell
Lieut. Josiah Holford, and
Quarter Master Samuel Spence
who died during the Campaigns
of 1854 and 1855
This cross is erected
by their
brother officers
of H.B.M:s
Twenty Eight Regiment
1856."


Men who served in the Crimea